70sscifiart:

Tim White

70sscifiart:

Tim White


vincentiusmiskolciensis:

Dying lions from Nineveh.

(via sonofthecailleach)



For the first time in the history of Iraq, Mosul is now empty of Christians.
Patriarch Louis Sako (via dolmaenthusiast)

(via kchikurdi)


fictorum:

Viktor Vasnetsov.

fictorum:

Viktor Vasnetsov.

(via goddessoftheblackcoast)


jibadojo:

The Ghost of Oiwa and Kamiya Iemon

jibadojo:

The Ghost of Oiwa and Kamiya Iemon

(via savage-america)


thebonafidebonafide:

How pigeons give falcons the slip — A Peregrine Falcon dive-bombing at several hundred miles an hour to knock a pigeon out of the sky would seem to be a study in single-mindedness. At those speeds, attention must be paid. But even a falcon in hot pursuit can become distracted. And what distracts it, is a patch of white feathers on the rump of an otherwise blue-gray pigeon. “The brain can be primed by a conspicuous thing,” said Alberto Palleroni. The falcon, he said, sees the conspicuous thing — the white patch — and doesn’t notice the pigeon starting to turn away and escape. “In effect, it’s a kind of a card trick or a ruse” on the part of the pigeon, Palleroni said. Palleroni et al. (2005) observed more than 1,800 falcon attacks on wild pigeons over seven years. They recorded the plumage types among the pigeons and noticed that while birds with white rump patches made up 20% of the pigeon population, very few were captured by the falcons. When a Peregrine Falcon attacks a pigeon, it plunges at speeds greater than 200 miles an hour, levels off and comes upon the pigeon from behind, punching it with what amounts to a closed fist. At those speeds even a grazing blow kills the pigeon; the falcon then circles back and picks it up. The only way the slower-flying pigeon can escape is by dipping a wing, rolling and veering off. If the falcon is distracted by the white patch, it won’t notice the dipping of the wing (which, being blue-gray, blends with the landscape) until it’s too late.

thebonafidebonafide:

How pigeons give falcons the slip — A Peregrine Falcon dive-bombing at several hundred miles an hour to knock a pigeon out of the sky would seem to be a study in single-mindedness. At those speeds, attention must be paid. But even a falcon in hot pursuit can become distracted. And what distracts it, is a patch of white feathers on the rump of an otherwise blue-gray pigeon. “The brain can be primed by a conspicuous thing,” said Alberto Palleroni. The falcon, he said, sees the conspicuous thing — the white patch — and doesn’t notice the pigeon starting to turn away and escape. “In effect, it’s a kind of a card trick or a ruse” on the part of the pigeon, Palleroni said.
Palleroni et al. (2005) observed more than 1,800 falcon attacks on wild pigeons over seven years. They recorded the plumage types among the pigeons and noticed that while birds with white rump patches made up 20% of the pigeon population, very few were captured by the falcons. When a Peregrine Falcon attacks a pigeon, it plunges at speeds greater than 200 miles an hour, levels off and comes upon the pigeon from behind, punching it with what amounts to a closed fist. At those speeds even a grazing blow kills the pigeon; the falcon then circles back and picks it up. The only way the slower-flying pigeon can escape is by dipping a wing, rolling and veering off. If the falcon is distracted by the white patch, it won’t notice the dipping of the wing (which, being blue-gray, blends with the landscape) until it’s too late.


thebonafidebonafide:

Philippine Eagle (Monkey-eating Eagle)




nitratediva:

George Sanders reading Baudelaire in Albert Lewin’s 1945 adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. This is basically the intersection of everything I love.

me too

nitratediva:

George Sanders reading Baudelaire in Albert Lewin’s 1945 adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. This is basically the intersection of everything I love.

me too

(via dar-jeel-ing)



Ancient Roman gold bracelet in the form of a coiled snake
1st century AD, Pompeii (The British Museum)

Ancient Roman gold bracelet in the form of a coiled snake

1st century AD, Pompeii (The British Museum)

(via dar-jeel-ing)



ibrahimhalilbaran:

Salên 1950î jineka Kurd û pitika wê. 

ibrahimhalilbaran:

Salên 1950î jineka Kurd û pitika wê.