ancientpeoples:

Sandstone statue of king Montuhotep II 
Statue of the king shows him in his Heb-sed (jubilee) costume. This feast was meant to renew the king’s youth and demonstrate his strength as king, so as to be show to be fit to rule Egypt. 
Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 11th dynasty, 2051 - 2000 BC. 
Found in Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, temple of Montuhotep II 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Sandstone statue of king Montuhotep II 

Statue of the king shows him in his Heb-sed (jubilee) costume. This feast was meant to renew the king’s youth and demonstrate his strength as king, so as to be show to be fit to rule Egypt. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 11th dynasty, 2051 - 2000 BC. 

Found in Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, temple of Montuhotep II 

Source: Metropolitan Museum


bedsigh:

Blood moon // 4.15.14 

(via andyouandeye)


helainetieu:

We just went outside to look at the blood moon!

helainetieu:

We just went outside to look at the blood moon!

(via eyeseeyouniversoul)


femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
At the request of the wonderful laclefdescoeurs, today I’m writing about John William Waterhouse’s 1892 painting Circe Invidiosa.
One of Waterhouse’s defining features as a painter is what Christie’s calls his “particular brand of late, academic Pre-Raphaelitism.”
I might quibble, as the Tate does, that he only “revived the literary themes popularised by the Pre-Raphaelites, though he was not Pre-Raphaelite in technique,” and indeed “[h]is fondness for backgrounds conceived as blocks of colour and tone, as well as the broad, chunky brushwork of his draperies and accessories, ultimately derive from such European prototypes as Jules Bastien-Lepage.”
Certainly the setting has none of the careful precision of, say, Millais’ Ophelia, while the composition has greater depth and three-dimensionality than the somewhat more (superficially) comparable work of Rosetti’s.
And indeed, he was very much a painter of his own time, not merely a mimic of the past: as the Royal Academy puts it, “Waterhouse’s paintings reflect his engagement with contemporary issues ranging from antiquarianism and the classical heritage to occultism and the ‘New Woman.’”
That said, he nonetheless picks up very Pre-Raphaelite themes, as Circe indicates.
Here clearly from a Roman text—Ovid’s Metamorphoses—rather than a Greek, this second of Waterhouse’s three versions of Circe pours a viscous and vividly green concoction into the glass-like water below her. Meanwhile a creature roils the water from beneath her feet, foreshadowing the monstrous transformation Circe’s rival in love will undergo as a result of Circe’s sorcery.
The near-abstraction of the background, though not especially Pre-Raphaelite, serves a useful end: Circe seems to float over the surface of the painting as she does over the water—interacting with it but sharply distinct from it—making her the clear and vivid focal point of the image.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

At the request of the wonderful laclefdescoeurs, today I’m writing about John William Waterhouse’s 1892 painting Circe Invidiosa.

One of Waterhouse’s defining features as a painter is what Christie’s calls his “particular brand of late, academic Pre-Raphaelitism.”

I might quibble, as the Tate does, that he only “revived the literary themes popularised by the Pre-Raphaelites, though he was not Pre-Raphaelite in technique,” and indeed “[h]is fondness for backgrounds conceived as blocks of colour and tone, as well as the broad, chunky brushwork of his draperies and accessories, ultimately derive from such European prototypes as Jules Bastien-Lepage.”

Certainly the setting has none of the careful precision of, say, Millais’ Ophelia, while the composition has greater depth and three-dimensionality than the somewhat more (superficially) comparable work of Rosetti’s.

And indeed, he was very much a painter of his own time, not merely a mimic of the past: as the Royal Academy puts it, “Waterhouse’s paintings reflect his engagement with contemporary issues ranging from antiquarianism and the classical heritage to occultism and the ‘New Woman.’”

That said, he nonetheless picks up very Pre-Raphaelite themes, as Circe indicates.

Here clearly from a Roman text—Ovid’s Metamorphoses—rather than a Greek, this second of Waterhouse’s three versions of Circe pours a viscous and vividly green concoction into the glass-like water below her. Meanwhile a creature roils the water from beneath her feet, foreshadowing the monstrous transformation Circe’s rival in love will undergo as a result of Circe’s sorcery.

The near-abstraction of the background, though not especially Pre-Raphaelite, serves a useful end: Circe seems to float over the surface of the painting as she does over the water—interacting with it but sharply distinct from it—making her the clear and vivid focal point of the image.

(via defeatthewind)


Classical depictions of the Lunar Goddess

Selene, The Goddess Of The Moon

According to the ancient Greeks, Selene was the goddess of the moon. She was the daughter of Gaia, or Mother Earth, and Uranus, or Father Sky. Selene was one of the Titans, the 13 immortal children of Gaia and Uranus. Selene and her brother, Helios, were responsible for controlling the movements of the sun and moon across the sky.

http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/selene-the-greek-moon-goddess-facts-lesson-quiz.html#lesson


King Menkaure, the goddess Hathor, and the deified Hare nome

King Menkaure, the goddess Hathor, and the deified Hare nome



The Hourglass Nebula

The Hourglass Nebula


Madonna in Glory with Saints, Pietro Perugino

Madonna in Glory with Saints, Pietro Perugino


San Francesco al Prato Resurrection, Pietro Perugino

San Francesco al Prato Resurrection, Pietro Perugino


(via demoniality)


ra108:

Helios (God of Sun) - Temple of Athena , Troy

ra108:

Helios (God of Sun) - Temple of Athena , Troy

(via tedderoo)


libutron:

Dumontinia tuberosa | ©Tatiana Bulyonkova
Dumontinia tuberosa (Bull.) L. M. Kohn 1979 is an inedible fungus in the family Sclerotiniaceae, commonly known as Anemone Cup.This colony was found in the Central Siberian Botanical Gardens, Siberia, Russia.
Fungi - Ascomycota - Pezizomycotina - Leotiomycetes - Helotiales - Sclerotiniaceae - Dumontinia - D. tuberosa

libutron:

Dumontinia tuberosa | ©Tatiana Bulyonkova

Dumontinia tuberosa (Bull.) L. M. Kohn 1979 is an inedible fungus in the family Sclerotiniaceae, commonly known as Anemone Cup.

This colony was found in the Central Siberian Botanical Gardens, Siberia, Russia.

Fungi - Ascomycota - Pezizomycotina - Leotiomycetes - Helotiales - Sclerotiniaceae - Dumontinia - D. tuberosa

(via maighdean-na-ceiltigh)


Q
Oh! and by the way I tagged you on this "top 10 books that stayed with you" list, you seem to like to read (judging for your posts), of course you don't have to do it, just in case you feel like it, anyway I think your list would be really interesting and diverse.
A

I do read, vociferously. Is it that obvious? I’m following a train of thought but It’s an imcomplete picture. Even to me. Like a jigsaw puzzle. Or building Devil’s Tower in Close Encounters. You just cant help yourself

Of course reblog! I am trying to get out in the world.

I should think along those lines 4- posting for Easter and passover -I have a series based on the cruxifiction that would be interesting.

I recall the Marlboro Man connection- I found my other old ad. I’m going to scan it in. Those ads were like paintings, so gorgeous.

I’ll do the Top 10 books.

I made a tumblr subblog just to post art, but I can’t tell is anyone actually sees it. Have you seen it by any chance? The subblogs seem kind of strange.


Transhuman

Transhuman